Dissecting Two-Photon Microscopy

Dissecting Two-Photon Microscopy

Before the advent of microscopy, scientists such as Leonardo da Vinci had to surreptitiously dissect the human body to gather insights into its functional anatomy. Now, two-photon microscopy has further advanced our ability to peer into living tissues with minimal intervention. For instance, two-photon microscopy allows your window of vision to penetrate through a living mouse’s brain and marvel at a neuronal cell’s inner workings. Pan the microscope underneath the skin and you will see hair follicle stem cells dividing and regenerating in real-time. Over a tumor bulge, you can observe metastatic cancer cells migrating and invading blood vessels. The mechanics of this visual journey relies on two photons meeting each other at the same place at the right time.

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ACHOO – A Tale of Uninvited Sneezes

ACHOO – A Tale of Uninvited Sneezes

Outside of normal sneezing exists an entirely separate group of sneezing-related phenomena. One particularly common condition that affects up to 35% of Americans is called the photic sneeze reflex. This reflex is conveniently abbreviated as ACHOO (Autosomal Dominant Compulsive Helio-Ophthalmic Outburst syndrome), so named because it involves sneezing in response to sudden increases in light intensity.

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Capturing Light

Capturing Light

If you are 18 years of age, you have never known a world without a camera phone.  Today, the quality of digital phone cameras is crucial to social media platforms, to businesses seeking visibility, and to people documenting as much of their lives and environments as possible. In this article, we will explore the functions of camera mechanics that created one of the most essential remote sensing devices in human history.

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Putting the Spotlight on Artists Who Glow

Putting the Spotlight on Artists Who Glow

Jellyfish and fireflies – what is something these two animals have in common? They both glow! This emission of light by these organisms is called bioluminescence, a term combining the Greek word “bio” meaning “life” and the Latin word “lumen” for “light.” Bioluminescence is produced through a chemical reaction that occurs within cells. Over the years, scientists have gained an appreciation for bioluminescence and have adapted it not only for research and medical purposes, but also as a platform for their passion for art. This artwork, as captivating as the living organisms that it originates from, has become a beautiful way of introducing people to the wonders of biology.

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